Please select To the mobile version | Continue to access the desktop computer version
Return to list Post a new post

[Sexy Service]

The largest red-light district in Asia is in Tokyo, Japan, and tourists are mainly from China and South Korea.

39 0
Post time 2024-6-10 16:54:57 | View all Read mode

Register now to join Ufos Travel and make travel friends around the world

Login to follow friends and send messages. No Account? Register

×
Nowadays, many young people no longer like to follow the rules when traveling, and go to those scenic spots that are well known to the public. The travel of those born in the 1990s and 2000s is more inclined to curiosity. The more niche and interesting the place is, the more they want to explore it. This phenomenon occurs more often in foreign travel. Because of the cultural differences between us, there are often particularly interesting phenomena in foreign cultures, which drive our curiosity, such as the red-light districts that are particularly open abroad.

Tokyo-The largest red-light district in Asia is in Tokyo, Japan, and tourists are mainly from China and South Korea.

The term red-light district first appeared in 1894. There are always various sayings about its origin. When it comes to red-light districts, many people first think of neighboring Japan. In addition to its rich tourism resources, Japan's red-light district has also become a famous tourist attraction. The most famous red-light district is located in the golden area of ​​​​the city center of Tokyo, Shinjuku, and the mysterious building is Kabukicho.

Tokyo-The largest red-light district in Asia is in Tokyo, Japan, and tourists are mainly from China and South Korea.

Shinjuku is the largest entertainment center in the entire Tokyo area, with countless restaurants, bars, clubs, karaoke bars, cinemas, theaters and custom business places of all sizes. There are many guests of all kinds coming in and out every day. As Japan's No. 1 Happy Street, Shinjuku Kabukicho also has the title of Asia's largest red-light district. Every night, Kabukicho is brightly lit, and many shops are open all night.

Tokyo-The largest red-light district in Asia is in Tokyo, Japan, and tourists are mainly from China and South Korea.

In our impression, Japan is a very small and fresh country, but there are two sides to every place, so Japan has always been considered a very contradictory nation. On the one hand, they are reserved and polite, and they always bow in daily life and at work. On the other hand, Japan's culture in some aspects is very open. For example, this special area of ​​Shinjuku Kabukicho has become a popular attraction driven by many domestic travel agencies.

Tokyo-The largest red-light district in Asia is in Tokyo, Japan, and tourists are mainly from China and South Korea.

Shinjuku Kabukicho is completely different during the day and at night. During the day, Kabukicho has only sparse pedestrians and quiet shops, as if it is the most common commercial pedestrian street. However, at night, it turns into a city that never sleeps. Whether it is a karaoke bar or a hotel cinema, all kinds of entertainment facilities are available, which is completely a paradise for hedonists.

Tokyo-The largest red-light district in Asia is in Tokyo, Japan, and tourists are mainly from China and South Korea.

After rectification, most of the shops in Kabukicho are now legally operated. Kabukicho in Shinjuku, Japan has also become one of the world's famous red-light districts. It is driven by the Japanese Kabuki culture that tourists from neighboring countries continue to flock to Japan. More than 300,000 tourists come here every day for sightseeing out of curiosity, most of whom are Chinese and Korean tourists. If you come to Kabukicho during the day, you can see many tour groups visiting here.

Tokyo-The largest red-light district in Asia is in Tokyo, Japan, and tourists are mainly from China and South Korea.

In the bustling city of Tokyo, the hustle and bustle of Kabukicho in Shinjuku presents another side of this Asian economic center. After all, the pressure of work and life in Japan is huge, and people have to find some ways to vent their pressure, and the bustle of Kabukicho is formed from this. So when you travel to Japan, will you visit Shinjuku Kabukicho? What do you think is the difference between it and the red-light districts in other Asian countries? Welcome to leave a message to express your opinion.
Reply

Use magic Report

Reply

You have to log in before you can reply Login | Sign up

Points Rules

Complaints/Suggestions Contact

[email protected]

Unauthorized reproduction, copying and mirroring are prohibited.
Any violation, held legally accountable
  • Android APP
  • IOS APP
Copyright © 2001-2024 Ufos Travel All rights reserved All Rights Reserved.
Turn off the lights Publish One Post
WhatsApp
Back to top
Quick Reply To Top Return to the list

2024-6-24 22:27 GMT-7 , Processed in 0.191288 second(s), 33 queries .